Moving from Rural to Urban Areas

Sometimes, a city like Boca Raton, Florida receives new residents who move here from rural areas. We are not alone – in cities like Miami and Atlanta, relocation into and out of town is rampant. The question is, what problems do these strangers face?

Most of this migration can be traced to the search for jobs and a better lifestyle. Folks seeking a better lifestyle by coming to Boca Raton should have high expectations. Sure, the quality of life here is great, but a lot of it has been built up by long-time residents, and they welcome workers and retirees from other parts. There are many we can accommodate a high influx of new people, as we have our own roster of supporting institutions, from places of worship to skilled contractors who specialize in residential renovations.

May new residents don’t smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol. This supports social standards for our institutions and reinforces our air quality. Nothing protects the fabric of a community than a fight against drug-related crime, another important problem from which we offer haven. The good citizens of Boca Raton have learned to face these challenges with an unblinking eye. The local authorities are vigilant in enforcing laws against vagrancy, loitering, littering, public drunkenness, DWI, and disturbing the peace. Only by this kind of strong response can we preserve the heritage of our city and prevent the degradation we have witnessed in other parts of the country.

The Boca Raton Welcome Wagon enthusiastically greets retirees and wealthy entrepreneurs who look to our fair city as a base for their worldwide operations. Boca Raton offers the mix of values, traditions and heritage that attracts urbane, rich businessmen and financiers. Contrast this with the barely literate drifters who try to establish roots in less fortunate towns. Our consistent policy of welcoming the elite and discouraging those who would put undue pressure on us has paid off over the years, and we see no reason to change.

The lure of a metropolis like New York can be fatal to unsophisticated transplants. We recall the tragic loss of Myra O’Mally, who went there from her farm in rural Florida to live the big city life. She didn’t know which side of the street to walk on, and was run down on her first day here. We all chipped in and sent her ashes back to Broward County, but we are sure that this is not what her family had in mind for her. We have erected a plaque at the Municipal Building recounting her story, as a reminder to all of the problems faced when rural people migrate to the big city instead of choosing a friendly community like Boca Raton.

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